Compose NewsBits: RethinkDB, MariaDB, pgAdmin, MongoDB, RabbitMQ, NetBeans and more

Compose NewsBits for the week ending October 7th - RethinkDB Inc is closing, MariaDB to offer MyRocks/RocksDB, pgAdmin 4 1.0 released, MongoDB troubles, RabbitMQ at Compose, NetBeans lands at Apache, Noto Fonts are five years old and how to present your next presentation in glorious ANSI.

NewsBits is database news, developer news, cloud news and some curiosities from the IT world. On with the NewsBits!

Database Bits

RethinkDB Inc- The news of the end of RethinkDB Inc has required people to remember that one of the fine things about open source is that good code gathers community and community is what can keep good code going. Amongst the coverage of the news, some people took a moment to remember how far RethinkDB had come - back in 2009 Colin Charles blogged about RethinkDB, then an up and coming MySQL storage engine optimised for the new fancy trends in SSDs. The community inherits a very different database, with easy to manage clustering and administration, a fine query language and a powerful realtime mechanism for publishing data.

MariaDB - The MySQL offshoot looks like it will be pulling in the MyRocks variant of the RocksDB storage engine as part of its 10.2 release. The adoption was spotted by @markcallaghan who points to a JIRA ticket where its confirmed in the comments. There's a lot of work lined up in that ticket.

pgAdmin 4 - The ground up re-write of pgAdmin, the graphical management tools GUI for PostgreSQL, has arrived in the form of pgAdmin 4 1.0. The rewrite began when the developers found the UI toolkit they were using had been untouched for quite a few years. pgAdmin 4 is now, at its heart, a web application with native wrappers to make it a desktop application on Windows, macOS and now Linux. And yes, it can be run as an actual web application too.

MongoDB vs - A blog posting from a company called CleverTap caught some attention as it documented their attempted switch from MMAPv1 to WiredTiger and back to MMAPv1 with their MongoDB installation. While some suggested it showed problems with WiredTiger, Charity Majors wrote of Accidental DBAs with some very fine advice on why you should be paranoid when making major changes. We hesitate to mention that Compose makes it easy to be paranoid by letting you bring up a whole new deployment with just a couple of clicks.

Compose Bits

RabbitMQ - At Compose, the RabbitMQ beta came to an end with the announcement of full availability for the message broker. RabbitMQ is great for decoupling complex, inter-related applications and giving them a reliable, resilient communications fabric to work with. We use it at Compose to help orchestrate our many, many database deployments.

Tool Bits

NetBeans@Apache - Before JavaOne, Oracle announced it wanted to send NetBeans, the venerable Java IDE which Sun acquired back in the day, to the Apache Foundation's incubator. Well, this week, that process actually began with the NetBeans incubation page appearing on Apache.org. There's a lot to do to get through incubation so in the meantime, you may want to check out the most recent version, NetBeans 8.2, released last month with ES6 and early ES7 support, enhanced PHP7 support, multi-cursor editing and a new SQL query profiler.

Display Bits

Noto Fonts - Google's Noto Fonts are five years old and still growing in adoption. Noto stands for "No more Tofu", Tofu being the little ⯐ character that appears when a system can't find the character to display. With Unicode, that means a font that never displays tofu will have to cover 110,000 characters -and creating an open source font covering those 110,000 characters is the Noto mission. You can download all 470MB of Noto fonts from the Google Noto Fonts page or just select the ones you need. Take Noto Sans, available with 4 styles, 581 languages and covering 237 regions.

ANSI Slides - Want to do a presentation but not interested in using a fancy GUI to write or display it? Check out Patat - Presentation And The ANSI Terminal - which uses Pandoc and Haskell to do just that. Install it and then author your presentation in Markdown.