Little Bits 36 – ArangoDB, PostgreSQL 9.6, Redis, Ambry, Rails 5 and more

There's a new version of ArangoDB, a new beta of PostgreSQL 9.6, an important update for Redis 3.2, a CDN centric media store from LinkedIn, a Redis 5 RC release, a new license for Cygwin, a sticky encryption fight and a rather essential parrot - All the links that caught the eye of Compose's technical content curator in the past week.

Database-y

ArangoDB 3.0 – The open source JSON/Graph/Key-Value database ArangoDB has reached version 3.0 with the latest release. Top new features include improved clustering with self-organizing clusters, graph functions now native to the AQL query language, persistent indexes and a new storage format "VelocyPack" which apparently reduces memory use by 20%. There's also a 3.0 update to Foxx, ArangoDB's microservice framework. The Apache 2 licensed application which also uses RocksDB has a repository on GitHub.

PostgreSQL 9.6 – The second beta of PostgreSQL 9.6 is available for testing. There's updates to the extensions the work with parallel queries, better join performance and more. And to remind you this is a not for production beta, there's a set of changes between beta 1 and beta 2 which can generate errors during dump/restore. There'll be many more beta between now, the release candidates and the expected final release at the end of the year. In other news a pg_visibility contrib module has been added to 9.6 which lets debugging peer into and manipulate the visibility map related to tables.

Redis 3.2.1 – If you run your own Redis, you'll want to be ready to update to Redis 3.2.1 which fixes a critical bug in the Sentinal. Antirez summarizes other fixes in his announcement with full details in the release notes. Compose has 3.2.1 available now.

Ambry – LinkedIn announced the open sourcing of their Ambry distributed object store last month. This is a store optimized with a purpose, to store and distribute media with high availability, horizontal scalability, low maintenance, fast repairability and globally located. The Ambry announcement looks at the design decisions and a high level view of the store, how clusters are built and consumed with Ambry and where it fits. There's a more hand on view on the Ambry GitHub repositry too, along with the source of course.

Developer-y

Rails 5.0.0 RC2 – It's getting close, Rails 5.0.0 that is, with a second release candidate being announced this week. Turbolinks is upgraded for better rendering, rails-api is now built in, Action Cable is added for real-time message management, CoffeeScript is the default JavaScript option and the whole thing moves to Ruby 2.2.2 or later. Oh and a little thing, the rails command now works out if it should have been a rake command and does the right thing. This is all stuff worked on from a year ago and it's been on a long long time in beta so the RC2 is a light at the end of the tunnel. You can read more in the edgeguides and in December's beta 1 blog post.

Cygwin – The venerable Cygwin library, the heart of the Cygwin project that lets you link Linux applications so they run on Windows, has been re-licensed from GPL to LGPL3. This means that, as long as you can swap the library out of binaries, it can be used with non-GPL software without creating new licensing issues, The announcement was made by the Cygwin team at Red Hat and has apparently been in the works for a while so not a response to Microsoft/Canonical's Ubuntu compatibility layer for Windows.

Encrypt-y

Let's Encrypt – The non-profit encryption-for-all group Let's Encrypt put out a plea to encryption company Comodo to stop trying to trademark the "Let's Encrypt" name. Comodo's response to this is a complaint that a not-for-profit stole their business model of giving free SSL certificates. (Update: 25/6/17 - Comodo have withdrawn their trademark applications according to Let's Encrypt).

Funn-y

:parrot: – Love Party Parrot? Want to bring Party Parrot to your command line to celebrate when you're latest deployment completing? Then you need terminal-parrot. It's easy to build Go code and when running it, you'll find it's got tunable enthusiasm! Also good for seeing what you can do with termbox-go. For more, try Shrug's partyparrot.